I Moved My Citrus Tree; Lemon Tree, Orange Tree, Lime Tree…

Citrus tree leaf drop can be caused by many things. In container citrus there is a common theme that runs through what we hear… There are many variables that can come into play with this statement, but things can be ruled out when yo become a detective. What is commonly heard is:

  1. The leaves on my citrus tree are falling off;
  2. My lemon trees leaves are curling and dropping;
  3. My orange tree leaves are yellowing and falling off.

Answering these questions can be a hard thing to do right out of the gate.

Generally the above statements in the timeframe of when we hear them allows conclusions to be made. Most generally this time of year (COLD WEATHER) is when we hear about leaf drop the most and that is what this writing is focused on for the most part. Citrus trees are a little temperamental so relocating them can sometimes be a trigger for leaves to be falling off the tree. They “shed” in a sense because they are comfortable in a happy environment where the temperature was consistent.  By moving the tree, the environment has changed and the tree is unsure of what to do; thus a defense mechanism is enacted and the tree starts shedding…

What should you do when your citrus tree is moved and the leaves start falling?

First off try to transition the tree from an outdoor space of full sun into a shade spot for a few days or weeks. Then transition the tree to the indoor space where you have lots of sunlight for the tree to get.

Secondly, make sure to water differently that what you did while your little friend was outside. Remember the environment has changed and that could effect how often the tree needs/or doesn't need watered. Just be sure to keep the soil moist to the touch which is the way citrus trees like it.

Third. Hang in there as citrus trees are resilient little buggers. If you have green branches, the chances are that things will come back to normal in the new environment.  Knowing this you can view the tree loosing its leaves just like a common cold in humans and know that your citrus tree will pull through with a little TLC.

TIPS:

Water. Keep soil moist to the touch. Spoon water your citrus a little every day or every other day.  Your environment will help you determine the real way to water and keep the soil moist.  Sometimes a soaking of the roots will help get water back into soil that has dried out severely…

Fertilize. Yep, you heard right. Fertilizing the tree may help as well. Knowing that your tree is protected and indoors we could say that feeding the tree can provide new growth and deliver leaves that replace the that have fallen off. A good fertilizer such as the GrowScripts “Green” fertilizer which lasts 6-8 months is the way to go when fertilizing. Slow release is what we want to focus on though. So get a good slow release fertilizer on the base of the tree.

Micronutrients. Vitamins for the tree are the best way to explain this. Commercial growers use foliar micronutrients as a part of the growing regimen every day. We want you to do the same thing and apply a good foliar feeding of micronutrients to the leaves of the tree. You can do this on a weekly basis, monthly basis, or as needed… But in the case of no leaves, or a few leaves on the tree you can spray the trunk, branches and even the soil to get some good stuff to the tree for an aid in rebounding. Be sure to get micronutrients that can be diluted in water and applied with a hand sprayer or pump bottle which you can find at many retailers without question.  

The micronutrients mentioned are a combination of minor elements citrus trees crave. Head over to growscripts.com to learn more. Here is a link directly to the product suggested: http://shop.growscripts.com/Citrus-Tree-Micronutrient-Nutritional.html