Sweet orange scab forms spores on the surface of the scab pustules. This species of scab attacks mainly fruits. The conidia ( asexual spores) are similar to those of E. fawcettii, require moisture for spore production and are primarily spread by splashing rain. Fruits are susceptible for 6 to 8 weeks after petal fall. The role of ascospores (sexual spores) is uncertain.

Serrano, D., Serrano, E., Dewdney, M., and Southwick, C. (2010). Citrus Diseases. USDA/APHIS/PPQ Center for Plant Health Science and Technology. [09-14]